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Calender, the taste of freedom

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Calender, the taste of freedom
Calender, the taste of freedom

Francisco Rabaneda y Cuervo was born in 1934, in Pasaia, Spain. Because his mother worked as a “first hand” at Balenciaga, little Francesco immersed himself in the world of fashion and haute couture at a very young age. In 1959, he published in the “Women’s Wear Dealy”, a series of geographic lines, under the name of Franck Rabanne. It will finally be his collection of a line of accessories in 1965, which he called “Pacotilles” which made him known, and Francisco Rabaneda Y Cuervo then became Paco Rabanne. He entered the arena of perfumery in 1969 with “Calandre”, an original feminine fragrance .

Grille, heritage of freedom

The 1960s marked the beginning of female anticipation. It was also during this period that the couturier had the idea of ​​incorporating metal into his haute couture dresses. In 1968, he imagined a dress for Françoise Hardy of 9 kg of fine gold and 300 carats of diamonds… An exuberance taken to its climax that Paco Rabanne continues to work on. A year later he developed “Calandre”, his first feminine fragrance.

Since the time puts women in the spotlight, it seems logical that the great couturier would do it too, but not in a classic way! It is with daring and originality that he will create this perfume, since the bottle is directly inspired by a car. For Paco Rabanne, the car is in fact a symbol of freedom and the emerging recklessness of women around the world. Produced with a touch of impertinence, a hint of daring and a great dose of freedom, the very first perfume by Paco Rabanne is today a great classic of perfumery .

The sassy notes of Calandre

It is the perfumer Michel Hy who was in charge of producing this first opus. “Calandre” begins with the energizing and very fresh notes of bergamot associated with an aldehyde accord. The heart of “Calandre” is ultra feminine with the presence of rose, jasmine and lily of the valley. The background is much richer and more dense. It is composed of white musks, vetiver, sandalwood and amber associated with woody notes. The bottle is a pure architectural work. Between glass and metal, the bottle could not be more modern.

To help women in their struggles for women’s freedom, Paco Rabanne imagines “Calandre”. Even if the bottle is shaped like a car hood, “Calandre” is a feminine fragrance. The car symbolizes the brand new freedom, and the designer also wants to add his stone to this great building. A daring, sassy composition that makes “Calandre” one of the greatest classics in perfumery.

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